Fall Grades Posted to Banner

As an early Christmas present, the Registrar’s office delivered fall grades to a bannerweb account near you. With the shortened exam schedule, professors had grades in much earlier this year yielding prompt feedback.

Thoughts?

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16 thoughts on “Fall Grades Posted to Banner

  1. Actual scores aside, this is good news. In the past, we waited weeks to get grades. I’m glad that they’ve shifted the schedule ahead so that we get meaningful feedback while courses and our work is still fresh in our minds. Thank you College Registrar!

  2. Were they perfect? No. BUT it is nice to know I won’t have to return all of middkids gifts and that the return flight will be in use!!

    Happy Holiday..

  3. Really wish they had given us more post-Thanksgiving time to complete our work. Not to drag it out, but just so that we could submit something of quality. This semester’s end was far too abrupt.

  4. If anyone is interested, the reason grades came in early is to avoid the highly awkward scenario of having students return to campus in January to discover that they… cannot. Faculty crammed last week to get them in earlier than ever, and now we’re all happy to be free of the shadow of grading over the holidays!

  5. anywhere from 5-8 students per common, per semester. think GIS, Organic Chemistry, etc. Two Ds or a D and an F in a three-course semester is considered failing.

  6. gdawg– I agree with you: I think there should be more feedback than a just a letter grade. At the very least, I think Profs should be required to give back graded exams.

  7. While as parents it might be informative to hear if your kid attended class and overall put forth good effort (thus making the “C+” acceptable vs the gift of one), especially if they’re paying the bills. However, students have all semester to seek feedback from professors during office hours, after class, etc. Plus, I am thinking that as fairly intelligent folk, you have a pretty good clue as to how you did, why you got the grade you did and know what you took from the class. And unless your ego just needs extra stroking, I imagine being able to do much about bad news is pretty much non-existent after the fact. And if you feel you got a better grade than you earned, do you really need to be told why? And if you really had no idea there was the possibility you were gong to fail, whose to blame for your being so disconnected? As a parent I miss parent/teacher conferences, but as a student I think you have to own your education. As it is, did you write feedback about your professor for other students? Seems those kind of notes would be helpful to a lot more people if you think about it.

  8. we do write feedback about the professor on the course evaluation forms. we are encouraged to write as much as we can, grading the professor and the class. we dont simply rate a professor with a B-. There are comments. Professors should afford students the same luxury. Not for parents, but for the students.

  9. Many faculty do give detailed feedback on finals and it varies quite a bit by discipline/professor. Years ago, I would leave papers with lots of feedback for students to pick-up after break – less than 1/3 picked them up. Then I told students that if they want feedback, they should let me know on the final papers – again, most did not. Now I do everything via email, so I send brief feedback to everyone – whether they want it or not!

  10. @ Prof. Mittell: You’re actually the only Professor who’s given me feedback on a course in my six semesters at Midd!

    It would be ideal if every Professor provided feedback in this way. Before we get there though, I’m thinking of working to make it college policy that Professors have to return final exams with comments. A lot student initiatives don’t lead to tangible results, and this would be a concrete way of improving the quality of learning.

    Anyone interested in helping out?

    (For background, I’ve had two final exams returned to me in my six semesters, granted I haven’t asked for the others back.)

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